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Tag Archives: lifestyle

Our Gallery: Pocket Modernism

These days, many good Dieselpunks think about purchasing a pocket watch. Stylish accessory as it is, such watch gives some reasons for a doubt: isn’t it too old-fashioned? Too steampunk-y? Too far away from the Interbellum aesthetics?

OK, the Diesel Era legacy is very diverse. Most pocket watches offered today are loosely based on the so-called “classic” examples, Victorian or Edwardian or even 18th century timepieces. But a closer look at the actual watches made between the two world wars reveals that this useful device can be ultra-thin, ultra-modern and ultra-sophisticated. It can be digital, you know – in a Dieselpunk sense of the word. Here is a small gallery to help you believe in the watchmakers’ genius. Probably it will also help you to make your choice.

Ulysse Nardin Watch with 10 Complications. 1936

Ulysse Nardin Watch with 10 Complications. 1936

Old-fashioned, you say? Just old-fashioned enough to match your pinstripe suit or military-style outfit.

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Posted by on June 16, 2012 in art, dieselpunk, inspiration

 

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Our Gallery: Dieselpunk Timetools

Some dieselpunks do not need a watch. They are happy with their computers, cell phones and all kinds of gadgets, each one fitted with an electronic clock. For those who are looking for a “timepiece in style”, we are here with some tips.

Disclaimer: Dieselpunk Encyclopedia is a non-commercial body. All images are posted here on their aesthetical, historical and educational value only.

Since the Diesel Era was the Golden Age of aviation, pilot’s watch is a most obvious choice. But don’t hurry to shop for oversize multi-dial timepieces – nearly an inch thick, two inches wide, weighing half a pound and sporting a huge crown. First of all, will it fit your hand? What is good for the former Governor of California is good for someone else not for everyone. Second of all, sometimes understatement is the best statement. And the Golden Age aviation timetools with all their complications and navigating/calculating capabilities, were of modest dimensions. 70 years ago, a 42mm-wide watch, “normal” by today’s standards, was definitely oversize. The vast majority of aviation chronometers and chronographs were 35-39mm wide (w/o crown).

For example, this Omega WWW watch,* issued to the RAF in 1944, is 37.5mm wide:

Omega Cal. 30 T2 British Military WWW 1944

Omega Cal. 30 T2 British Military WWW 1944

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Our Gallery: Before It All Began

OK, now we know when the Diesel Era starts – on November 12, 1918, right after the Armistice. The date is agreed, so let us prepare for the International Dieselpunk Day!

But the date doesn’t mean we cannot look into earlier period for inspiration and information. Here is a gallery – the first in a row of three or four, – inspired by various discussions on dieselpunks.org. With (almost) no weapons, automobiles and aircraft. Just some useful devices and a touch of style.

If 1900s and 1910s are claimed by Steampunk, Dieselpunk can also lay a claim. Actually, it is possible to build a 100 per cent dieselpunk setting from technologies and artifacts available before 1920 or even 1914. First of all, diesel engine is here since 1897.

Grazer Diesel, 1915. Technisches Museum Wien

A perfect example of the stationary diesel engine built in 1915 in Graz, Austria-Hungary. We have to wait until 1923 when a diesel will be put in a truck but the first diesel motor vessels were commissioned in 1903 in Russia and France, and only a year later the French Navy had its first diesel submarine. By the way, do you know what was the first ocean-going surface ship fitted with a diesel?

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