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Our Gallery: Pocket Modernism

16 Jun

These days, many good Dieselpunks think about purchasing a pocket watch. Stylish accessory as it is, such watch gives some reasons for a doubt: isn’t it too old-fashioned? Too steampunk-y? Too far away from the Interbellum aesthetics?

OK, the Diesel Era legacy is very diverse. Most pocket watches offered today are loosely based on the so-called “classic” examples, Victorian or Edwardian or even 18th century timepieces. But a closer look at the actual watches made between the two world wars reveals that this useful device can be ultra-thin, ultra-modern and ultra-sophisticated. It can be digital, you know – in a Dieselpunk sense of the word. Here is a small gallery to help you believe in the watchmakers’ genius. Probably it will also help you to make your choice.

Ulysse Nardin Watch with 10 Complications. 1936

Ulysse Nardin Watch with 10 Complications. 1936

Old-fashioned, you say? Just old-fashioned enough to match your pinstripe suit or military-style outfit.

For frequent travelers, there is a world-time watch. A similar timetool produced today could be called a ‘GMT’:

Vacheron & Constantin World Time. 1936

Vacheron & Constantin World Time. 1936

Need a chronograph? You’ve got it:

Audemars Piguet for Gübelin. 1930s

Audemars Piguet for Gübelin. 1930s

Black dial? More protection? Here’s the solution:

A. Lange & Söhne Hunting Watch. 1930s

A. Lange & Söhne Hunting Watch. 1930s

More high-tech? What’s the problem:

Patek Philippe Two-Tone Sector Dial Chronograph. 1938

Patek Philippe Two-Tone Sector Dial Chronograph. 1938

Just a dress watch, but “in style”? What style exactly? Be assertive:

Zenith keyless dress watch

Zenith keyless dress watch

 

Gustave Sandoz 17 jewels. 1930

Gustave Sandoz 17 jewels. 1930

 

A. Lange & Söhne. 1940

A. Lange & Söhne. 1940

 

Jaeger-LeCoultre Staybrite Dress Watch with Double Date Calendar

Jaeger-LeCoultre Staybrite Dress Watch with Double Date Calendar

 

Omega cal. 38.5L T1. 1937

Omega cal. 38.5L T1. 1937

 

Patek Philippe Yellow Gold Dress Watch. Movement: 1927. Case: 1936

Patek Philippe Yellow Gold Dress Watch. Movement: 1927. Case: 1936

 

Longines Lifetime. 1920s

Longines Lifetime. 1920s

 

Hamilton Cal. 921. 1941

Hamilton Cal. 921. 1941

And don’t hesitate to ask for extra features – like a moon phase:

Patek Philippe Digital Perpetual Calendar. 1937

Patek Philippe Digital Perpetual Calendar. 1937

A touch of old Navy (and naval aviation)? All big guns, flying boats and ever-faithful pocket watches?

Auricoste French Navy watch

Auricoste French Navy watch

 

IWC Kriegsmarine pocket watch

IWC Kriegsmarine pocket watch

 

Longines BU.Aero. U.S. Navy 21 jewels

Longines BU.Aero. U.S. Navy 21 jewels

More feminine maybe? There are ladies aboard our zeppelin, don’t forget!

Vacheron & Constantin Minerva. 1925

Vacheron & Constantin Minerva. 1925

 

Saturno Cal. 28mm 15 jewels. 1930s

Saturno Cal. 28mm 15 jewels. 1930s

Digital, we said. No hoax: this style is called American Digital:

Patek Philippe American Digital. 1947

Patek Philippe American Digital. 1947

Ah, triple calendar is not digital enough? Well, what would you say about this one:

Vacheron & Constantin unique timepiece for Alexander I Karagjordgevic, King of Yugoslavia. 1931

Vacheron & Constantin unique timepiece for Alexander I Karadjordjevic, King of Yugoslavia. 1931

No reason to hesitate – if you need a pocket watch for your Dieselpunk outfit, just go for it.

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4 Comments

Posted by on June 16, 2012 in art, dieselpunk, inspiration

 

Tags: , , , , ,

4 responses to “Our Gallery: Pocket Modernism

  1. iarxiv

    June 16, 2012 at 3:51 pm

    Very cool selection! Didn’t know Alexander Karađorđević had one of those…

     
  2. Michael Lin

    June 17, 2012 at 1:09 pm

    Отдохновение для глаз 🙂

     
  3. dieselpunksencyclopedia

    June 17, 2012 at 1:29 pm

    Воистину!

     
  4. patek philippe

    January 18, 2013 at 7:52 pm

    Hi there, just wanted to mention, I liked this article.
    It was inspiring. Keep on posting!

     

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